# Bedel Tiscareno | AHA Artist in the Press

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Bedel Tiscareno 11AUG2018 v1

Bedel Tiscareno - Section of AHA Tearsheet 2018

 

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For further information and visuals, please contact Norma or Francesca: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

212-810-7716 or 347-743-4132

 

# Nola Romano | AHA Artist in the Press

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bump1 orig

Nola Romano - "BUMP" (2017) Acrylic on canvas - 72" x 60"

 

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For further information and visuals, please contact Norma or Francesca: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

212-810-7716 or 347-743-4132

 

Prescient Presence: "Your Presence is Requested"

by antemag.com

Opens Thursday, June 28 at 131 Chrystie Street

Solitude and displacement rub elbows on the confluence of the fault lines defining Your Presence is Requested. This group exhibition, featuring painting, sculpture, mixed media and more, investigates the presence of self both internally, physically and even in the case of absence: the vestiges of self that can linger in the outlines of landscapes, or in abstracted self-portraits. Opening on Thursday, June 28th from 6-9 pm, the exhibit is housed at 131 Chrystie Street in Manhattan’s Lower East Side neighborhood. The exhibit features artists Maria Dimanshtein, Juan Miguel Palacios, Vincent Arcilesi, Arlene Rush, Grace Baxter, India Evans, Junichiro Ishida, Suyeon Na and many more. The exhibition is produced by Arcilesi | Homberg Fine Art in partnership with Maria Dimanshtein.

Aptly identifying and probing the span of narratives that connect figuration and abstraction, the exhibit applies a careful lens to the both constructed and candid depictions of self. One can identify with an event, an object, a location or a particular viewpoint of one’s own persona. Emotional and psychological perspectives are firmly entrenched in the various aspects that artists choose to portray in this insightful group exhibition, on view June 28-30 only (hours 11 am-6 pm on Friday/Saturday.) This exhibit evinces a rare comprehensive look at the range of artistic stylings and approaches in both visioning and re-visioning the self as beginning and end, alpha and omega. Nothing can influence one’s own outlook as much as the mysterious psyche, the hidden depths of self that remain necessarily unable to reveal yet reveling in their surroundings. From the cryptic depictions of Twins by Arlene Rush, to Palacios’ lush, painterly portraiture and Arcilesi’s multi-hued figures situated in ambiguous space, the range of artwork on view is sure to delight any collector.

 

01 vincent arcilesi

Artwork by Vincent Arcilesi

 

At times alternately introspective and extroverted, the works on view vary widely in style and subject matter while intrinsically examining the parameters of self. Artist Maria Dimanshtein notes that her works include… “use dark colors along with white ink and shiny textures to incorporate my poetic writing into my visual [art].” Dimanshtein notes that her art probes many subjects, including, “anxiety of freedom vs. comfort of the mundane [and] a yearning for a divine power.” The works prove as impactful as their meanings are elusive, with the artists mostly monotone compositions combining with text to provoke dizzying and at times discomfiting narratives.  .

With works by over twenty artists on view in Your Presence is Requested, Arcilesi | Homberg has assembled a dazzling breadth of viewpoints examining the human psyche. On view for three days only, this not-to-be-missed exhibit connects the threads of self-examination present in the works of world-renowned artists working across the spectrum of contemporary art practices.  Arcilesi | Homberg sees their focus as forging innovative pathways in the world of contemporary art, noting that they “challenge conventional fine art parameters”. Your Presence is Requested goes a long way to showcase these efforts.

 

02 maria dimanshtein

Artwork by Maria Dimanshtein

 

The exhibition opening on Thursday, June 28 from 6-9 pm features music compliments of DJ Danny Glover along with wine. The exhibit at 131 Chrystie is in the heart of Manhattan’s buzzy Lower East Side gallery district, easily accessible from the J/Z trains at Bowery station or the 6 train at Spring Street.  The artwork on view spans a variety of artistic mediums, and artists will be available in person to discuss their works and specific processes.

For additional questions, concerns and for extra visuals please contact Francesca Arcilesi (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), Norma Homberg (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) or Maria Dimanshtein (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

03 Artwork by Juan Miguel Palacios

Artwork by uan Miguel Palacios

 


# Max Greis | AHA Artist in the Press

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terra detail

Max Greis - "Terra Incognita" (2015) - collage & acrylic on panel - 40" x 30"

 

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For further information and visuals, please contact Norma or Francesca: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

212-810-7716 or 347-743-4132

 

# Maria Dimanshtein | AHA Artist in the Press

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Maria Dimanshtein AHA artist in the press

Maria Dimanshtein - from the series "The states of mine"

 

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For further information and visuals, please contact Norma or Francesca: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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#ArleneRush | AHA Artist in the Press

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Rush Twins cameo 2

Arlene Rush "Twins Cameo III Diptych (2012), digital prints with frames, 33.5 h by 48 w by 2 inches deep"

 

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For further information and visuals, please contact Norma or Francesca: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

212-810-7716 or 347-743-4132

 

#JeremiahJohnson | AHA Artist in the Press

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Dream Trailer 1970

Jeremiah Johnson "Dream Trailer"


see Video: The Dream Home Project

 more artwork from Jeremiah Johnson


For further information and visuals, please contact Norma or Francesca: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

212-810-7716 or 347-743-4132

 

#JohnBreiner | AHA Artist in the Press

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lonelywanderstudy

 John Breiner "lonely wander study"

 

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For further information and visuals, please contact Norma or Francesca: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

212-810-7716 or 347-743-4132

 


 

# Carol Crawford | AHA Artist in the Press


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HOMELAND Carol Crawford

 Carol Crawford "HOMELAND"

 

 read more about Carol Crawford: 272 words - the AHA Fine Art Blog


For further information and visuals, please contact Norma or Francesca: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

212-810-7716 or 347-743-4132

 


 

# Vincent Arcilesi | AHA Artist in the Press


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Vincent Arcilesi AHA Artist in the press

  

view also: 272 words - AHA Fine Art Blog



For further information and visuals, please contact Norma or Francesca: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

212-810-7716 or 347-743-4132

 


 

Art on Paper Folds Together Elegance and Unruliness

With 85 galleries this year, the New York art fair devoted to works on paper explores the large and small, the personal and political.

by Daniel A. Gross

img art on paper press

 Timothy Paul Myers and Andrew Barnes, “Understory” (all images by the author for Hyperallergic)

 

If you walk to the southernmost part of the Lower East Side, past a waterfront construction site, a fire station, and a row of graffiti-covered trucks, you’ll find — or, depending on your sense of direction, possibly not find — Art on Paper 2018 inside the giant Pier 36 warehouse. This year, the event is larger than ever before, with 85 galleries bringing together drawings, paintings, photography, sculpture, and a range of other objects and oddities. On opening night, March 8, a drummer and electric cello player performed live near the entrance, making the fair sound like a podcast in which hundreds of people have gathered to murmur about art and sip bubbly from plastic cups.

 art on paper 02

 Installation view of Art on Paper 2018

Last year, visitors were met at the entrance with giant towers of hand-cut paper, and the 2018 fair plays with scale in a similar way. Just past the ticket booth, a shipping container-sized room contains everything you’d expect to see in a live-in basement — a couch, a television, harsh lightbulbs, stairs — but all of it is wrapped in orange felt. The installation is “Understory,” by Timothy Paul Myers and Andrew Barnes (whose work also became a favorite last year), and it earns the attention it attracts. Delightful details crowd the room: clothes strewn about, boxes shoved part of the way into corners. One almost expects an orange-colored college dropout to come walking down the stairs. It has the opposite effect of a cloth-wrapped Christo building: instead of elevating architecture with an artistic intervention, Myers and Barnes soften and electrify an almost claustrophobic domestic space.

As visitors move past the entrance, into the dozens of booths that line the room, the work quickly shrinks in size. One tiny work — smaller than a sheet of printer paper — manages to catch the eye by imitating insect displays in natural history museums. “Afterlife,” by Rachel Grobstein, appears to capture and categorize all sorts of biological and pop cultural matter: a football helmet, a lightning bolt, earthworms, an hourglass. Amidst the brightly-colored clutter, the tiny eyes of paper birds stare out at you.

 

aha fine art 01

 Rachel Grobstein, “Afterlife,” gouache, paper, pins

 

Source: https://hyperallergic.com/431677/art-paper-folds-together-elegance-unruliness/

 

For further information and visuals, please contact Norma or Francesca: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

212-810-7716 or 347-743-4132 



Vincent Arcilesi, Summer Night in Rome.
Vincent Arcilesi, Summer Night in Rome. On View at Arcilesi Retrospective.

A fully-formed surrealism permeates the figurative works of Vincent Arcilesi in his retrospective, on view from October 26-29 at the High Line Loft in Chelsea. The human figure reigns supreme in Arcilesi’s masterworks, in which various stages of life from birth to death, and various actions over the course of that life, are documented with a fine-tuned stylistic quality. Arcilesi treats his figures according to their surroundings: a warm light permeates outdoor figures while his indoor scenes display a more muted treatment of light. The flesh tones exhibit a plaintive quality: beckoning the viewer in to discover more while holding true to a sumptuous treatment of form. Throughout his works, Arcilesi demonstrates a strong knowledge of color, infusing his works with strong hues that delicately balance the composition of his works.


Detail from ”Dreamers in a Palace Square”, Vincent Arcilesi
Detail from ”Dreamers in a Palace Square”, Vincent Arcilesi, On View in Retrospective

Arcilesi’s storied career takes center stage on this exhibition, with figure studies, sketches and landscapes supplementing these rich, large-scale figurative paintings. The range of human emotions are placed in the framework, in many cases, of the classical world. Allegories and mythological references abound, as do art historical references. The multiple layers of meaning embedded in the works only serve to elevate the high quality of the artworks themselves. A pleasant marriage of form and content results.

Duane Street Loft by Vincent Arcilesi
Duane Street Loft by Vincent Arcilesi, On View at Retrospective

A visit to the Arcilesi retrospective is crucial visit for any art lover passing through New York City who admires the classical stylings which Arcilesi masterful wields. The show is on view from 12-6 pm on Saturday, Oct 28 and Sunday, Oct 29 at the High Line Loft, 508 W 26th Street #5G.


by Audra Lambert
Art Critic, Curator, Cultural Producer
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/author/audra-lambert

A wall of Lacquer ART and don’t you love it

Suyeon Na Illustrates Lucid Dreams


Korean-born artist Suyeon Na's work centers on the interaction of female psychology with the fluctuating contemporary world. She uses mythological figures and symbols to create these meditative, nuanced works.

Suyeon Na Illustrates Lucid Dreams

Suyeon Na is now based in New York. She completed her BFA in Seoul and her MFA at the Pratt Institute in New York. Her mixed-media paintings and collages on paper focus on exploring powerful female archetypes and symbolic meanings of the female body in folklore. By merging her mythological imagery with patterns and colors in contemporary fashion and media, she visualizes a dreamlike, synthetic reality that incorporates art, craft and design. Her work has been widely exhibited at numerous venues throughout the US, Korea, Japan and India. She has also been awarded multiple grants and studio residencies in programs such as the NYFA Immigrant Artist Mentoring Program, the Vermont Studio Center and the Chashama Workspace Program.

“My work centers on the interaction of female psychology with the fluctuating contemporary world, using mythological figures and symbols. I am drawn to the transformative power of visual storytelling. By weaving my own personal mythology into my work, I investigate the psychology of self that revolves around changes in personal, social and cultural environments. The images in my work mirror dreams, fairytales and fantasies that are closely linked to our subconscious and animalistic instincts. I explore powerful female archetypes and symbolic meanings of the female body. I consider their diverse expressions in the history of art and culture from the classic to the contemporary, ranging from ancient folktales to movies, games and animation. I recreate these archetypes and the symbolism of the female form in a cryptic space filled with patterns and images on paper and textiles. By cutting, pasting and drawing, I deconstruct and reconstruct the existing images and patterns in various contexts, such as women’s clothing, upholstery and quilting fabric as well as accessory and cosmetics advertisements, which attempt to arouse consumer desires and manifest lifestyles in contemporary society. By employing these female prototypes and natural forms, which hold sway over the human psyche, with artifacts of today’s world, I examine who we have become and where we are now.”

read more




Source: https://www.juxtapoz.com

Link: https://www.juxtapoz.com/news/illustration/suyeon-na-illustrates-lucid-dreams/


A wall of Lacquer ART and don’t you love it

A wall of Lacquer ART and don’t you love it

Yeah-That-is-what-I-need

Yeah! That is what I need. To pack a few things and get away from winter


gilf! Whose graphic heavy street art gave way to the exploration of the self with her show #checkyourselfie. The photographs are self revelatory of its subject giving us a voyeuristic yet knowingly accessible peek into their psyche. Taking a “selfie” with your phone is as ubiquitous as finding a hipster in Brooklyn.

Beneath The Lacquer by Ran Kowatari and David DuPuy not only highlights the nail art but the narrative of a lesbian wedding ...

Yeah! That is what I need. To pack a few things and get away from winter

The dual shows that AF walked into at 111 Front Street in the DUMBO section of Brooklyn was diverse but it all came down to one thing: personal human stories. gilf! Whose graphic heavy street art gave way to the exploration of the self with her show #checkyourselfie. The photographs are self revelatory of its subject giving us a voyeuristic yet knowingly accessible peek into their psyche. Taking a “selfie” with your phone is as ubiquitous as finding a hipster in Brooklyn. Beneath The Lacquer by Ran Kowatari and David DuPuy not only highlights the nail art but the narrative of a lesbian wedding. It is a story that culminates into a day in the life of nuptial bliss. The photos reveal much emotion and the beauty of the nail art serve as “points” in the story. A celebratory feel for both with cupcakes and nail art done on the premises gave this slice of art in Brooklyn something worth sinking your teeth into or polish to a high gloss. Maybe I should have taken a selfie at the show. (Or had my nails done.)



gilf! – #checkyourselfie & Ran Kowatari and David DuPuy: Beneath The Lacquer

On View: February 6 – 28, 2014

Gallery Hours: Wednesday – Sunday (12 to 6 pm)

Arcilesi Homberg Fine Art. 111 Front Street, Suite 222. Brooklyn , NY 11201


Text by: Oscar A. Laluyan

Photography by: Olya Turcihin



New York artist GILF! recently unveiled a fresh body of work at Arcilesi Homberg in DUMBO.

gilf! - i EXAM

Entitled i Exam, this brand new series of paintings comes from a different direction than her previous graff & stencil style.


Drawing from the experiences of recent travels to Berlin and Miami and utilizing the 90s visual effects of the “Magic Eye”, GILF flips the retro switch and begs the question that in the age of digital preoccupation and corporate & marketing bombardment, why don’t we take a closer look?

GILF! – “i EXAM” @ Arcilesi Homberg

New York artist GILF! recently unveiled a fresh body of work at Arcilesi Homberg in DUMBO. Entitled i Exam, this brand new series of paintings comes from a different direction (as seen in our visit to her studio) than her previous graff & stencil style. Drawing from the experiences of recent travels to Berlin and Miami and utilizing the 90s visual effects of the “Magic Eye”, GILF flips the retro switch and begs the question that in the age of digital preoccupation and corporate & marketing bombardment, why don’t we take a closer look? On the surface, all the lines and patterns are very visually appealing, but upon closer inspection you’ll realize there’s more than meets the eye. A underlying message reveals itself once you stare at the image. This show is up until March 10th so check it out if you’re in Brooklyn.
Photo credit: AK

i EXAM

i EXAM

i EXAM

Posted by juggernut3, February 19, 2013


Title: All the things the Art on Paper Fair does right

Close Up - Rachel Grobstein

Another year, another Armory Week and again I find myself at the same conclusion: I just love the Art on Paper fair so much ...


Art on Paper had plenty of recognizable names on offer: author and artist Dave Eggers’ humorous sketches of animals at Electric Works, as well as Barnaby Whitfield and William Powhida at Gallery Poulsen. But I’ve always relished discovering new artists at the fair, and this year I wasn’t disappointed. Josephine Taylor’s pastel-colored paintings of nudes at Catharine Clark Gallery were entrancing, and Rachel Grobstein’s miniature paintings mounted on pins played tricks on the eye at AHA Fine Art.

All the things the Art on Paper Fair does right

Another year, another Armory Week and again I find myself at the same conclusion: I just love the Art on Paper fair so much. Despite the inevitable swollen feet and exhaustion that will come to a head by Sunday evening, I honestly look forward to frenzied madness of the New York art world’s spring awakening. It’s a time when the city’s creative class comes out of hibernation to socialize and show off its latest wares in a week-long ceremony that looks forward to the promise of the warmer seasons’ openings, parties and general hubbub. The week’s grand dame, the Armory Show, routinely provides a drool worthy selection of masterpieces I’ll never be able to own. At the Independent, dealers manage to pull of museum-quality presentations in pop-up form. And the SPRING/BREAK fair is always guaranteed to serve up a crash course in the who’s who of the downtown scene and takes fairgoers urban spelunking through some of New York’s most unusual spaces. But the Art on Paper fair, one of the week’s rare themed events, has for the past three years beat out the competition at providing both a healthy range of price points and a genuinely pleasant viewing experience for art. It’s become my Armory Week sanctuary.

The team behind Art on Paper, Jeffrey Wainhouse and Max Fishko of Art Market Productions, have art fairs down to a science, which is perhaps why their roster of prestigious fairs— which includes Miami Project, the Seattle Art Fair, and Market Art+Design to name a few—continues to grow. But Art on Paper, with its unique and loose “paper” theme, stands out. And so, here are all the things I loved about this year’s Art on Paper fair, in no particular order:

Spacious Viewing
Space can come at a pricey premium at fairs, but at Art on Paper dealers and art alike have plenty of room to spare. While the fair’s venue, Pier 36, is a bit of a hike from the nearest bus or subway, it’s airy, has plenty of natural light, and don’t laugh at me but the bathrooms are incredible and spotless. And every so many feet organizers provide benches or standing tables for fairgoers to rest their legs or organize the many leaflets they’ve collected along the way.

Booths that benefitted from the extra legroom were Brooklyn’s Space 776, which brought work by a single artist named Jungsan Kim Yun-sik. The Korean artist’s large scale works feature fragments of poetry painted onto long sections of folded and framed scrolls and matchbook-sized blocks, arranged so that from afar the text forms soft geometric patterns. Meanwhile, Center Street Studio showed Brian Andrew Whitely’s now-infamous Trump Legacy Stone, a monument that he originally planted anonymously in Central Park as part of a guerrilla art project. Along with the headstone, the gallery sold and made on-site rubbings from the monument’s engraving, which reads: “Trump, Donald J., 1946-, Made America Hate Again.”

Ambitious Installations
Tahiti Pehrson’s soaring installation The Fates greeted visitors at the fair’s entrance, and was comprised of three 17-foot-tall boxy paper towers illuminated from above and cut with intricate swirling designs based on the Fibonacci sequence. The work was created for Pehrson’s residency with Viacom, and it was first shown at the company’s Times Square offices.

Also at the front was Timothy Paul Myers’ life-sized, gray felt installation The Living Room, shown by Walter Maciel Gallery. The sculpture featured all the trappings of a domestic interior in monochromatic form—a comfy chair, framed pictures on a fireplace mantle, and stacks of books on the floor—but Myers disrupts the scene with an eruption of floral forms that spill forth from the hearth.

Varied Price Range
At Philadelphia’s Paradigm Gallery I stumbled upon Alex Eckman-Lawn’s cut paper collages. The pieces, which started at $250, feature meticulous renderings of human anatomy, organic plants and animals, layered in shadow boxes to create compact vignettes with macabre underlying themes. Eckman-Lawn also works as an illustrator and creates comics, and was among my favorite affordable discoveries at this year’s fair.

Copenhagen’s Gallery Poulsen brought work by New York-based artist Mi Ju, whose incredible paintings filled with enormous worlds populated by tiny fantastical characters I’ve previously written about for Observer. Her paintings blue-hued Fishing Dreams and Sleepwalker were going for $16,000 a piece.

A Little Something for Everyone
Japanese and East Asian specialists Ronin Gallery brought a mix of contemporary and historic Ukiyo-e prints, but it was the prints by Japanese artist Hideo Takeda (a cartoonist who was given a rare solo exhibition at the British Museum in the 1990s) that caught my eye. On the other end of the fair, photographer works from Kris Graves’s The Testament Project were on view at Sasha Wolf Projects’ booth. Graves describes the project on his website as “an exploration and re-conception of the contemporary black experience in America.” A wall of portraits lined the booth, each one saturated in a completely unique combination of vibrant hues.

Big Names and New Discoveries
Art on Paper had plenty of recognizable names on offer: author and artist Dave Eggers’ humorous sketches of animals at Electric Works, as well as Barnaby Whitfield and William Powhida at Gallery Poulsen. But I’ve always relished discovering new artists at the fair, and this year I wasn’t disappointed. Josephine Taylor’s pastel-colored paintings of nudes at Catharine Clark Gallery were entrancing, and Rachel Grobstein’s miniature paintings mounted on pins played tricks on the eye at AHA Fine Art.

A Great Theme
Art on Paper’s greatest strength is its theme, which is interpreted literally by some dealers who lean heavily toward showing prints and drawings, and more loosely by others like artist Peter Sarkisian, whose projected animations onto books and paper. In the instance of Dublin-based artist Anita Groener, whose works were shown by Gibbons and Nicholas, the medium was an effective platform for exploring the timely subject of migration, in this case, Europe’s refugee crisis. Using a digital paper-cutter, Groener produces tiny cut-outs of refugees based on real photographs, some caring luggage and others sparring with police. The figures are glued to pins and affixed to the wall, appearing like abstract dark marks from afar but revealing their individual stories upon closer inspection.

By Alanna Martinez


Source: OBSERVER.COM

Title: All the things the Art on Paper Fair does right

Link: http://observer.com/2017/03/art-on-paper-fair-photos-report-best-galleries-booths/

 Close Up - Rachel Grobstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magazin: HI FRUCTOSE - The New Contempory Art Magazine

Date: March 13, 2014

Link to view Content:

http://hifructose.com/2014/03/13/armory-arts-week-2014-fountain-art-fair/

 


 

 

All the things the Art on Paper Fair does right

Another year, another Armory Week and again I find myself at the same conclusion: I just love the Art on Paper fair so much ...

 

A close of Rachel Grobstein's Ajax, 2015-16.
Alanna Martinez

Big Names and New Discoveries

Art on Paper had plenty of recognizable names on offer: author and artist Dave Eggers’ humorous sketches of animals at Electric Works, as well as Barnaby Whitfield and William Powhida at Gallery Poulsen. But I’ve always relished discovering new artists at the fair, and this year I wasn’t disappointed. Josephine Taylor’s pastel-colored paintings of nudes at Catharine Clark Gallery were entrancing, and Rachel Grobstein’s miniature paintings mounted on pins played tricks on the eye at AHA Fine Art.

Rachel Grobstein at AHA Fine Art.
Alanna Martinez

Artist Margaret Withers on making art a priority and how to find inspiration

January 19, 2016

 Artist Margaret Withers - interview

 

Artist Margaret Withers is recognized for her works on paper which are a mix of narrative, abstract and modern surrealism. Her paintings explore conflicting ideas of joy and melancholy, as well as community and aloneness.

She’s exhibited her work in group and solo shows in the United States, and internationally in Brussels, Australia, Berlin, China, Vienna, and Russia. She lives and paints in Manhattan, New York.

    “If you slow down how you see things to where you’re almost in a meditative state, then you can find inspiration in anything. You can look at things differently as if you’re seeing them for the first time. There’s inspiration in that slowed-down space.”

Margaret Rolecke is under the top 10 favorite works of Architectural Digest!

Margaret Roleke - Architectural Digest

 


 

" Today we present an interview with and tone poem by visual artist Margaret Withers. I’m really digging her vision of her ideal library; make sure to check it out! ~ Laura

Library as Incubator Project (LAIP): Tell us a little about yourself – who are you, where are you from, and what sort of creative work do you do?

Margaret Withers (MW): I’m a visual artist and I currently live in New York City, but I grew up in Texas and also lived for a long stretch of time in Colorado. I primarily paint abstract narratives or anti-stories that revolve around the idea of home and communication.

LAIP: What is/has been your relationship to libraries–as a reader, as an artist, as a community member…however you feel like answering the question!

MW: When I was around nine or ten, I would go by myself to visit my grandmother who lived on a farm. I had absolute freedom to do anything I wanted to do during the day as long as I was home for dinner. So, I would ride my bike 5 miles into town, go buy grapes and licorice whips and hang out at the library and read magazines and newspapers. So for me, the library was a safe and orderly place where I could go and be around adults but not feel powerless or small (and they didn’t yell at me for sneaking in grapes).

LAIP: As an artist, what would your ideal library look or be like? What would it have in it?

MW: My ideal library would have incandescent lights with lots of windows and skylights, and be peaceful, comfortable and open on Sunday’s and nights. It would have an adult only poetry cave that would be magical in that, once you entered, time would stop. It would contain all the poetry in the world and hot tea and cookies would be served on fine china by large Saint Bernard dogs.

 

Curious, USA

To get there, you follow a passage, not like this sentence is a passage, but instead, like a line is a passage, and you know that the road is there because you can see the

houses  and you look up and down the line and see the telephone poles with the telephone lines that snap in some breeze unfelt, at least by you, and listening, you hear the party lines hum with gossip and pig futures.

Do you see the eyes?   They’ve been there all this time, just staring at you, as if they’re waiting for their cue, and you think you know what this is all about, that you’ve seen this written down on scraps of paper that were crumbled up and tossed in a trash can, where you repeatedly dug them out and smoothed them on your knee while mumbling to yourself that, really, it’s ok to move on.
Well, the mouth,   you understand, it’s just a souvenir, picked up at a Stuckey’s store somewhere in West Texas, where afterwards, you pulled out of the parking lot and back onto the road, snapping your eyes up from the mesmerizing pull of the telephone lines as they stretch from pole to pole, rolling down into the curve and back up, click, and down, then back up, click, keeping time with the purr of the tires on the blacktop, and beyond that you see the flat darkness of the fields, corn rows fanning out in the curve of each line

, and before long a house interrupts this flow and you see your own tired eyes reflecting back at you in the glass. You quickly roll down the window just to feel the cool breeze and you stare straight ahead and somehow you know that this image is just a passage moving through this curious American landscape and that, if you look away now, you might just miss it. "

 

read more under: http://www.libraryasincubatorproject.org

 


 

Margaret Withers

 

A QUARTERLY PUBLICATION FOR EMERGING ARTISTS

SUMMER 2014 VOLUME 3 ISSUE 2


 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 


 

Jesse_Scaturo How to build a better chicken 

Jesse Scaturo, How to Build a Better Chicken (All Photos By Gail)

If you’ve been following the blog over the past week, you probably know that I did some exploring at the Galleries at 111 Front Street in DUMBO. While it is, as a rule, nearly impossible to get me to leave Manhattan, I discovered many cool galleries in this not-that-inconveniently-located space, and am compelled to share some of what I saw with you.

 

Margaret Roleke - Baroque War

Baroque War Revisted By Margaret Roleke

One gallery I popped into is AHA Gallery, also called Arcilesi Homberg Fine Art. AHA is currently hosting a diverse Contemporary art group show called Balls to the Wall. Some casual music fans may think this title is a reference to AC/DC, but it is actually the title of a song by German Metal band Accept. The song’s video prominently featured the use of a wrecking ball, long before Miley Cyrus was even conceived. But I digress.

 

gilf! - All I See Are Naked Emperors 

All I See Are Naked Emperors

The collection of works that make up Balls the Wall has a lot of humor in it, as if you couldn’t tell by the title alone.

 

gilf-geometrics

You can see thumbnails of most of the art with cursory “What and Where” info at This Link, but, sadly the show lacks a locatable Press Release. So, I’m afraid that unless you physically go and see the show, which I reccommend, you’re on your own as far as identifying the artists beyond what I was able to glean from my own admirable sleuthing skills.

 

lebowski 

 

I think the collage piece above might have something to do with The Big Lebowksi, but I am not sure. 

 

 centaur

 

Balls to the Wall Will be on Exhibit Through June 29th , 2014 at Arcilesi Homberg Fine Art, (AHA Gallery), Located at 111 Front Street, Suite 222, Brooklyn (DUMBO), NY. Hours are Wednesday – Sunday 12 Noon – 6:00 PM and by Appointment.

 

AHA Show - Balls to the Wall

 

Arcilesi | Homberg Fine Art

 

source: http://worleygig.com/2014/06/12/balls-to-the-wall-at-arcilesi-homberg-fine-art/

(All Photos By Gail)

 


 

“Do It Yourself and Do It Well at Fountain Art Fair”

Still Burning - Embroidery Thread and Fabric

“Do It Yourself and Do It Well at Fountain Art Fair”

” In a different but decidedly related vein, a work by Sophia Narrett at the booth of Arcilesi | Homberg Fine Art dismantled the idylls of a kind of Garden of Eden (whose overall shape vaguely resembles the US) with glee. Titled “An Origin of Dolls,” the piece made from embroidery, yarn, and acrylic is vigorously messy and frayed, its edges coming apart as if Narrett were still steeped in the process of creation.”

read more about Sophia Narrett

source: http://hyperallergic.com/113370/do-it-yourself-and-do-it-well-at-fountain-art-fair/ 


 

Best of CUTLOG Art Fair 2014

The Parisian contemporary art fair, Cutlog, is back this year taking over the The Clemente, an old theater and cultural center in the East Village, showing a wide variety of innovative work in a maze like setting. Be sure to check every corner of this old building, cool work and interactive installations seems to hide themselves in the cubbies and the outside courtyards, begging to be found. Take your time exploring, this fair is all about the up and coming new artists, offering affordable work, and a new vision of the classic art fair model.

 

 

Margaret Roleke - Baroque War

Baroque War Revisted By Margaret Roleke


 Margaret Roleke

 

 

https://thewildmagazine.com/blog/best-of-cutlog-art-fair-2014/

 


 

aha_03-03-2013

Since her last show at Galerie Swanstrom this fall in New York, and Scope Art Fair during Art Basel Miami Beach this past December, gilf! has been tirelessly at work in the studio. Pulling inspiration from her recent travels to Berlin, and her large scale outdoor installation at Fountain Art Fair in Miami, she is proud to present a new body of work for her solo show I EXAM, with Arcilesi Homberg Fine Art Gallery this February. Please join us for an artist’s reception Thursday February 7th, from 6-9pm at 111 Front Street suite 222 in D.U.M.B.O, Brooklyn. The show runs from February 3rd- March 10th.

Created to challenge the viewer to see beyond distractions of the syndicated voice, I EXAM divulges an insightful response to the dizzying noise of our society.
These works consider the modern correlation between effort and understanding. In this age of digital preoccupation, we are trained by society to value speed, self, and efficiency. Our waning attention spans hinder us from being present, and from recognizing what is truly important in our communities. We stay on the surface, repeating sound bites, but not investigating the full story. We align ourselves with brands that we believe represent us, when we too often don’t take the time to find that true self.
Continuously inflated egos have narrowed our critical eye to a myopic lens focused on the self. We believe we no longer need one another for survival, and that an abstract number on an ATM receipt can measure success and happiness. As the bonds of community unknowingly disintegrate, we lose the ability to understand large-scale problems as unaffected individuals. These issues don’t immediately affect our daily lives, but instead linger in the shadows of a foreboding future.  Are we capable of looking beyond the noise to regain understanding of our true reality?
I EXAM challenges our inclination to blindly accept societal norms, rousing the viewer to wake from the comfort of that hypnotic state to embody reality in its most authentic form.
“Rise like Lions after slumber
In unvanquishable number
Shake your chains to earth like dew,
Which in sleep had fallen on you
Ye are many, they are few”
-Percy Shelley, The Mask of Anarchy 1819

 

source: http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/2013/02/03/arcilesi-homberg-fine-art-gallery-presents-gilf-i-exam-brooklyn-ny/#.UwCinF5sJpo